UK and France sign nuclear energy agreement

16 February 2012 Last updated at 19:02 ET

The UK is to sign a deal with France to strengthen co-operation in the development of civil nuclear energy.

Anh và Pháp sắp ký thỏa thuận tăng cường hợp tác trong lĩnh vực phát triển năng lượng hạt nhân dân sự .

The government says it reiterates (tái khẳng định) the UK’s commitment (cam kết) to nuclear energy “as part of a diversified energy mix (nguồn năng lượng đa dạng)”.

The coalition says the agreement will create a number of commercial deals in the nuclear energy field, worth more than £500m and creating 1,500 UK jobs (tạo ra thêm 1.500 việc làm tại Anh) 

Defence will also be on the agenda (trong chương trình nghị sự) as PM David Cameron and President Nicolas Sarkozy hold a summit (cuộc họp cấp cao, kỳ họp thượng đỉnh) in Paris.

An announcement about joint development (nghiên cứu chung, hợp tác phát triển ) of a future unmanned aircraft (máy bay không người lái) is also expected.


‘Joint framework’ – Khuôn khổ Hợp tác

“This joint declaration (tuyên bố chung) will signal our shared commitment (cam kết chung) to the future of civil nuclear power, setting out (mở ra, khởi động ) a shared long term vision of safe, secure, sustainable and affordable energy, that supports growth and helps to deliver our emission reductions targets,” a statement from Downing Street said.

 

Analysis

Hugh Schofield BBC News, Paris


Personal relations between Nicolas Sarkozy and David Cameron have not been warm of late (gần đây).

There have been tetchy remarks (những nhận xét khó chịu, chỉ trích gay gắt ) flying in both directions (qua lại), the French irritated by the British veto on the European fiscal treaty, the British annoyed by (bực tức vì) what seem to be sometimes rather gratuitous (vô lý, vô cớ) criticisms of the UK economy coming out of (xuất phát từ) Paris.

Summits like this oblige (bó buộc) a different tone and so the emphasis will be on the long-term and deeper shared interests between the countries, especially in the civil nuclear and military fields.

For Mr Sarkozy, this could be one his last encounters as president with David Cameron. In the polls he’s way behind the socialist challenger Francois Hollande, who incidentally will himself be visiting London at the end of this month.


The two governments will work together with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) “to strengthen international capability to react to nuclear emergencies and establish a joint framework for cooperation and exchanging good practice (cách thực hành tốt) on civil nuclear security”.

The move (động thái này) comes 11 months after the tsunami (sóng thần) in Japan which wrecked (làm hư hại, hỏng nặng) the nearby the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, leaking radioactive material into the air and sea.

UK and French public and private sector bodies (các tổ chức thuộc lĩnh vực nhà nước và tư nhân) in the civil nuclear power industry will also work more closely (mật thiết hơn) in a number of areas.

These include education and training (giáo dục và đào tạo); research and development (nghiên cứu và phát triển), and security.

“As two great civil nuclear nations (cường quốc hạt nhân dân sự), we will combine our expertise (trình độ chuyên môn cao) to strengthen industrial partnership, improve nuclear safety and create jobs at home,” said Mr Cameron.

 

Eight sites

Last June, ministers announced plans for the next generation of (thế hệ mới) UK nuclear plants.

The EU budget treaty was on the agenda when the two leaders last met in Paris in December

The government confirmed a list of eight sites it deems suitable (xét thấy phù hợp) for new power stations by 2025, all of which are adjacent to (kề cận với) nuclear sites.

The sites are: Bradwell, Essex; Hartlepool; Heysham, Lancashire; Hinkley Point, Somerset; Oldbury, Gloucestershire; Sellafield, Cumbria; Sizewell, Suffolk; and Wylfa, Anglesey.

And earlier this month the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (Ủy ban Kiểm soát Hạt nhân Hoa Kỳ) has approved the first nuclear reactors to be built in the country since 1978.

 

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